Black Hills

Black Hills

Book - 2010
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Haunted by Custer's ghost, and also by his ability to see into the memories and futures of legendary men like Sioux war-chief Crazy Horse, Paha Sapa plans to silence his ghost forever and reclaim his people's legacy--on the very day FDR comes to Mount Rushmore to dedicate the Jefferson face.
Publisher: New York : Reagan Arthur Books/Little, Brown and Co., 2010
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780316006989
031600698X
Characteristics: 487 p. ; 24 cm

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LouWSytsma
Jun 28, 2013

This book totally caught me off guard and blew me away. Plain & simple. Partially because it does not seem to garner the same attention Simmons's other recent books do. And partially while I enjoy reading Simmons's books, he favors world building to that of character and I always find his characters somewhat cool and aloof. Not so with Paha Sapa. What a remarkable character and what a remarkable story Simmons tells about and through him.

I found the integration of his story with the history that was taking place during his life, plus the glimpses into other times, the most compelling of any book Simmons has done to date.

In some aspects, and I mean this in the most complimentary way, this is like Simmons's version of Stephen King's - The Dead Zone. The tragedy that Paha Sapa endured for the majority of his life was heart breaking and I loved how Simmons handled his life after meeting his granddaughter.

The recounting of the construction of Mount Rushmore, the Chicago World Fair of 1893, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, the exploration of George Custer and his wife, plus the glimpses of the world past, present, and future; all so engrossing and fascinating.

Just looking at all the research material and people Simmons conversed with is staggering.

And it all comes together so seamlessly to so poignantly tell the life story of this Sioux, or Lakota or Natural Free Human Being.

This is now my favorite Simmons book.

s
siharris
Nov 16, 2012

I'm a big Dan Simmons fan but although I enjoyed this it wasn't to the same extent I have his other books. A well written historical novel regarding the native american indian culture, but it's certainly not sinister like Drood, or visceral like The Terror. This is a more sedate affair but still worth the read.

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