Storming the Heavens

Storming the Heavens

Soldiers, Emperors, and Civilians in the Roman Empire

Book - 2001
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David Brown Book Co
The success of the Roman empire was largely due to the prowess of the legions but, likewise, a dissatisfied military was also responsible for some of the greatest threats to the empire's unity.
The success of the Roman empire was largely due to the prowess of the legions but, likewise, a dissatisfied military was also responsible for some of the greatest threats to the empire's unity. This study provides a readable and straightforward assessment of the Roman army and, in particular, the relationship between soldiers, their imperial commanders and the citizens they were supposed to protect, from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD. These centuries were marked by expansion and civil unrest as parts of the empire were treated less favourably than others and soldiers were not repaid. Santosuosso also looks at Augustus' successful attempts to reorganise the army, the mutual dependence of the emperor and his armies that followed, the daily life and equipment of soldiers, landmark battles and particular opponents. Finally, the study examines the defeat of the Roman army at the hands of a succession of invaders.

Baker & Taylor
The author illuminates an often overlooked incident within the Roman empire, shining light on a period in the late third century B.C. that saw the rise of social turmoil and terror perpetrated by the Roman army. 20,000 first printing.

Perseus Publishing
The success of the Roman empire was largely due to the prowess of the legions but, likewise, a dissatisfied military was also responsible for some of the greatest threats to the empire's unity. This study provides a readable and straightforward assessment of the Roman army and, in particular, the relationship between soldiers, their imperial commanders and the citizens they were supposed to protect, from the 3rd century BC to the 5th century AD. These centuries were marked by expansion and civil unrest as parts of the empire were treated less favourably than others and soldiers were not repaid. Santosuosso also looks at Augustus' successful attempts to reorganise the army, the mutual dependence of the emperor and his armies that followed, the daily life and equipment of soldiers, landmark battles and particular opponents. Finally, the study examines the defeat of the Roman army at the hands of a succession of invaders.

Book News
Santosuosso (history, University of Western Ontario) describes the role of the Roman military and facilitating the crises of the third century (BC). He considers the economic factors influencing the crisis, the practice of pillaging, the role of Caesar, the institutions of power within the empire, the twin threats of external invasion and internal unrest, and the eventual decline of the empire. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Illuminates an often overlooked incident within the Roman empire, shining light on a period in the late third century B.C. that saw the rise of social turmoil and terror perpetrated by the Roman army.

Publisher: Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 2001
ISBN: 9780813335230
081333523X
Characteristics: xi, 265 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm

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