The Dutch

The Dutch

A Milan Jacovich Mystery

Book - 2001
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Baker & Taylor
Private investigator Milan Jacovich is hired by a grieving college professor to uncover the truth about the suicide of his daughter, Ellen, a successful but unattractive executive.

McMillan Palgrave
Milan Jacovich, Cleveland's most popular private investigator, specializes in industrial security, but when another type of case comes up that is too good to resist he will agree to work on it. That is exactly what happens when Professor Carnine walks into his office in this 12th addition to the series.

Milan recognizes Dr. Carnine's name, but can't remember from where until Dr. Carnine explains. His daughter's body was found under a local bridge. The police agreed that 30-year-old Ellen Carnine committed suicide, or in street parlance "did the dutch." However, Dr. Carnine cannot accept that answer and wants Milan to find out what could have driven his daughter, somewhat of a recluse, to take her own life? He is filled with guilt that maybe there was something about his daughter he should have known, that maybe there was a way he could have helped her. Reluctantly, Milan agrees to take the case knowing that the outcome will not be happy for anyone.

Milan finds that Ellen spent most of her time on the computer either working or on the Internet and that she was appreciated by her bosses, a pair of young Cleveland entrepreneurs who made movies. But interviews with her few friends lead him to see her as an independent person who got satisfaction from her work and had accepted the fact that she was seriously overweight and physically unattractive.

Digging further, Milan comes upon upsetting small clues that shout "murder" to him, and suspicions about what her employers were actually up to grow. His investigation begins to take a different, and eventually dangerous, direction until he uncovers the horrific truth behind Ellen's death.


Blackwell North Amer
Milan Jacovich, Cleveland's most popular private investigator, specializes in industrial security, but when another type of case comes up that is too good to resist he will agree to work on it. That is exactly what happens when Professor Carnine walks into his office in this 12th addition to the series.
Milan recognizes Dr. Carnine's name, but can't remember from where until Dr. Carnine explains. His daughter's body was found under a local bridge. The police agreed that 30-year-old Ellen Carnine committed suicide, or in street parlance "did the dutch." However, Dr. Carnine cannot accept that answer and wants Milan to find out what could have driven his daughter, somewhat of a recluse, to take her own life? He is filled with guilt that maybe there was something about his daughter he should have known, that maybe there was a way he could have helped her. Reluctantly, Milan agrees to take the case knowing that the outcome will not be happy for anyone.
Milan finds that Ellen spent most of her time on the computer either working or on the Internet and that she was appreciated by her bosses, a pair of young Cleveland entrepreneurs who made movies. But interviews with her few friends lead him to see her as an independent person who got satisfaction from her work and had accepted the fact that she was seriously overweight and physically unattractive.
Digging further, Milan comes upon upsetting small clues that shout "murder" to him, and suspicions about what her employers were actually up to grow. His investigation begins to take a different, and eventually dangerous, direction until he uncovers the horrific truth behind Ellen's death.

Baker
& Taylor

Private investigator Milan Jacovich is hired by a grieving college professor to uncover the truth about the suicide of his daughter, Ellen, a successful but unattractive dot.com executive. 15,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : Thomas Dunne Books, 2001
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780312265793
0312265794
Characteristics: 293 p. ; 22 cm

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Vincent T Lombardo Apr 01, 2015

This was the 12th Milan Jacovich mystery that I read and the 12th in the series. (I have been reading them in the order that they were published). Perhaps because I have read so many of these books, I felt that this one, like the last one that I read, "The Indian Sign", could have been a little shorter. Milan broods a lot, is sanctimonious, and repeats himself, but, overall, this book was very good. Les Roberts is a great writer who always informs and entertains and keeps me turning the pages. What more can I ask? I still intend to read the rest of the books in this series.

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